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Course Description

Anthropology and development are tightly entwined: this programme brings together essential elements of both. It combines crucial anthropological insights into – and critiques of – economic globalisation and social transformation with the study of theories about development: both historical experiences and cutting-edge policy debates. 

This programme is offered by the Department of Anthropology with the assistance of the Department of International Development. 

The core Anthropology components of the programme offer you a comprehensive study of how anthropologists, from their unique vantage point, have understood globalisation and other economic transformations, as well as giving crucial insights into how they evaluate, criticise and contribute to development. Focusing on both 'Big D' development (schemes of improvement or projects) and 'little d' development (change which occurs as the result of economic growth or modernisation), the programme shows you how anthropologists have both changed practices from within as well as critiqued them from the outside. It also provides anthropological insights into new forms of production, consumption, exchange and financial circulation that have emerged since the 1980s.

The core International Development component of the programme provides you with key insights into the processes involved in overcoming poverty and creating healthy, wealthy and sustainable social change. The programme uses the latest theory in the social sciences to understand the processes, policy and practice of development.

Anthropology and development are tightly entwined: this programme brings together essential elements of both. It combines crucial anthropological insights into – and critiques of – economic globalisation and social transformation with the study of theories about development: both historical experiences and cutting-edge policy debates.  This programme is offered...

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Course Content

You will take a combination of compulsory and optional courses before submitting a dissertation.

(* denotes a half unit) 

Anthropology of Development*
Explores how anthropologists have evaluated, criticised and contributed to development.

Either 
Anthropology of Economy (1): Production and Exchange*
Examines ‘the economy’ as an object of social scientific analysis and a domain of human action. 
Or
Anthropology of Economy (2): Transformation and Globalisation*

Addresses topics on the anthropology of globalisation, exploring how scholars have understood new forms of production, consumption, exchange and financial circulation.

Either 
Development: History, Theory and Policy
Focuses on the major trends of development and change in modern history and interpretations of them in the social sciences; and contemporary economic and social theory and their bearing on the policy and practice of development.
Or
Key Issues in Development Studies*

Provides an overview of the key issues and debates in international development.
And
Option to the value of a half unit from an approved list

Dissertation
An independent research project of 10,000 words on an approved topic of your choice

You can find the most up-to-date list of optional courses in the Programme Regulations section of the current School Calendar.

You must note however that while care has been taken to ensure that this information is up to date and correct, a change of circumstances since publication may cause the School to change, suspend or withdraw a course or programme of study, or change the fees that apply to it. The School will always notify the affected parties as early as practicably possible and propose any viable and relevant alternative options. Note that that the School will neither be liable for information that after publication becomes inaccurate or irrelevant, nor for changing, suspending or withdrawing a course or programme of study due to events outside of its control, which includes but is not limited to a lack of demand for a course or programme of study, industrial action, fire, flood or other environmental or physical damage to premises.

You must also note that places are limited on some courses and/or subject to specific entry requirements. The School cannot therefore guarantee you a place. Please note that changes to programmes and courses can sometimes occur after you have accepted your offer of a place.  These changes are normally made in light of developments in the discipline or path-breaking research, or on the basis of student feedback. Changes can take the form of altered course content, teaching formats or assessment modes. Any such changes are intended to enhance the student learning experience. 

You will take a combination of compulsory and optional courses before submitting a dissertation. (* denotes a half unit)  Anthropology of Development* Explores how anthropologists have evaluated, criticised and contributed to development. Either  Anthropology of Economy (1): Production and...

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Entry Requirements

Upper second class honours (2:1) degree or equivalent in any discipline, with a genuine interest in anthropology and development, and areas of overlap between the two.

Competition for places at the School is high. This means that even if you meet the minimum entry requirement, this does not guarantee you an offer of admission.

English language requirements

You can meet our language requirements in the following ways:

  • You are a national of Canada or one of the UKVI list of majority English-speaking countries below (whose first language is English) or

  • You have successfully completed an undergraduate degree (of at least three years duration), a postgraduate taught degree (of at least one year) or a PhD in one of those countries listed below or

  • You have passed a recognised English language test at an appropriate level.

Please note that 2+2 undergraduate degrees where less than three years has been spent in a majority English-speaking country and degrees taken at overseas campuses of English speaking institutions in non majority English speaking countries (eg Chinese campuses of UK institutions) are insufficient to meet our requirements and you will be required to supply a test score. The same is true for students of the University of London International Programme (UoLIP) whose study has not been undertaken in a majority English-speaking country.

Upper second class honours (2:1) degree or equivalent in any discipline, with a genuine interest in anthropology and development, and areas of overlap between the two. Competition for places at the School is high. This means that even if you meet the minimum entry requirement, this does not guarantee you an offer of admission. English language requirements You can...

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Assessment Methods

All taught courses are required to include formative coursework which is unassessed. It is designed to help prepare you for summative assessment which counts towards the course mark and to the degree award. LSE uses a range of formative assessment, such as essays, problem sets, case studies, reports, quizzes, mock exams and many others.

Summative assessment will include examinations and essays, including an essay (dissertation) of not more than 10,000 words on an approved topic of your own choice, which is submitted in late August. An indication of the formative coursework and summative assessment for each course can be found in the relevant course guide.

All taught courses are required to include formative coursework which is unassessed. It is designed to help prepare you for summative assessment which counts towards the course mark and to the degree award. LSE uses a range of formative assessment, such as essays, problem sets, case studies, reports, quizzes, mock exams and many others. Summative assessment will include examinations...

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Additional Information

UK/EU students: £14,088
Overseas students: £21,744

Fee status

The amount of tuition fees you will need to pay, and any financial support you are eligible for, will depend on whether you are classified as a home (UK/EU) or overseas student, otherwise known as your fee status. LSE assesses your fee status based on guidelines provided by the Department of Education.

Start date :- 30 September 2019

Duration :- 12 months full-time, 24 months part-time 

Location :-  Houghton Street, London

UK/EU students: £14,088 Overseas students: £21,744 Fee status The amount of tuition fees you will need to pay, and any financial support you are eligible for, will depend on whether you are classified as a home (UK/EU) or overseas student, otherwise known as your fee status. LSE assesses your fee status based on guidelines provided by the...

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