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MMus Composition The stimulating compositional environment at Leeds, including the Group for Research in Improvised Music (GRIM) and the student-led new music group (FOCAM), allows numerous opportunities for composers to have their works performed. Recent composition events in the School of Music have included seminars by James Dillon and Rohan de Saram, workshopsconcerts by the London Sinfonietta and Ian Pace, and performances of student compositions by LSTwo (our in-house contemporary music ensemble), University Symphony Orchestras and Choirs. The MMus Composition programme (1 year full-time, 2 years part-time) focuses primarily upon contemporary music. Submission of a portfolio of compositions (which may include acoustic andor electroacoustic elements) is a compulsory element, supplemented by modules exploring arrangement and orchestration, multimediacollaborative works, and vocational music. One distinctive feature of the programme is that 60 credits may be taken from a range of optional modules, allowing students to tailor their studies to reflect their particular interests. These options cover subjects such as Music Technology, Performance, Applied Performance, Editing and Archival Studies, Applied Psychology of Music, Computer Music Studies, Issues in Contemporary Musicology, Dissertation or individually-negotiated writing projects. Key elements of the programme are as follows: Portfolio of Original Compositions (60 credits) This module is designed to help students develop a distinctive compositional personality and to equip them to deal effectively with a range of structural and creative challenges. Assessment is by submission of a portfolio of compositions, normally five or six items or their equivalent (large-scale enterprises can result in a smaller number), plus an accompanying written commentary, analytical or critical, as appropriate. The pieces are likely to represent a variety of titles using different musical media and showing some variety of approach, and a critically reflective commentary should expose recent enquiry relating to the compositions submitted. The precise syllabus is defined by negotiation between student and tutor, as the process of developing a folio of original compositions will be informed by research around the subject using appropriate examples. Thus it may be appropriate for a student wishing to embark upon a substantial piece for orchestra to have a working knowledge of titles by composers such as Tippett, Birtwistle and Lutoslawski, and to be able to hold well-informed discussions on these surrounding texts before the process of composition begins. Equally, a student wishing to explore more abstract concepts, such as temporality or metrical modulation, will be expected to research these areas as an aid to developing original scores. Composition Studies (30 credits) This module is designed to equip students to deal with a range of professional demands, and to understand the nature of commercial composition. On successful completion of this module, students should be able to write idiomatically for standard instruments and instrumental groupings, demonstrate an understanding of the technique of orchestration, show an awareness of stylistic trends as appropriate to the genrestyle under scrutiny, and evince an awareness of what constitutes commercially viable work for socially-based ensembles these may include electronic resources and music for video and film as appropriate. The precise nature of compositional study in this module is decided in consultation with module tutor. Students may wish to take the opportunity to specialise in a specific area of interest (in choral or brass ensemble music, for example), but most successful folios will consist of a variety of titles drawn from different artistic and commercial sources. A folio will typically consist of three items, or equivalent. The process of choosing three items (which are likely to show variety) is supplemented by research ar

MMus Composition The stimulating compositional environment at Leeds, including the Group for Research in Improvised Music (GRIM) and the student-led new music group (FOCAM), allows numerous opportunities for composers to have their works performed. Recent composition events in the School of Music have included seminars by James Dillon and Rohan de Saram, workshopsconcerts by the London...

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