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The MA in Research Methodology is designed for students and professionals, who have an interest in town and regional planning and wider public policy evaluation, to pursue a broadly-based research training programme. The degree aims to enhance the student's generic research and communication skills and critical analytical ability, complemented by a range of advanced specialised planning and policy evaluation modules, which are essential for a successful career across a wide range of planning related occupations, while also providing an excellent foundation for further post-graduate study. Course Aims The course aims to give students the opportunity to acquire the following skills as a foundation for a research-based career in planning related subject areas. More particularly, it aims to provide: an understanding of how to formulate precise research questions and an appreciation of alternative approaches to research a familiarity with the basic principles of research design and strategy together with a capacity for managing research and conducting and disseminating research in a way that is consistent with both professional practice and the normal principles of research ethics a competency in understanding and applying a range of methods and tools an understanding of the significance of alternative epistemological positions that provide a context for theory construction, research design, and the selection of appropriate analytical techniques the ability to manage and perform basic analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data and the ability to apply appropriate research methods and techniques in undertaking a planning-related research project. Course Structure The course has a modular structure. It comprises eight taught modules and a dissertation of up to15,000 words (equivalent to four modules). The first four modules are generic Research Methods modules taught by an interdisciplinary team to students across the Faculty of Social and Environmental Studies (on Tuesdays), while modules 5 to 8 are more subject specific and are taught within the Department of Civic Design. The modules are structured as follows: Introduction to Research (Semester 1) Data Collection Strategies (Semester 1) Data Analysis Strategies (Semester 2) Philosophy of Social Science (Semester 2) Department-specific core methodology module (Semester 1) Department-specific core methodology module (Semester 2) Department-specific optional module (Semester 1) Department-specific optional module (Semester 2) Dissertation Teaching, Learning and Assessment The course adopts a combination of teaching and assessment methods. The generic Research Methods modules (modules 1 to 4) taught at the Faculty level are assessed entirely by coursework. Teaching in the Department of Civic Design follows a range of approaches such as lectures, seminars, workshops, project work and tutorials. Students are assessed by a combination of coursework (such as essays, reports and seminar presentations) and examinations. The dissertation is a major component of the overall degree programme (equivalent to 4 taught modules). It provides an important opportunity to put into practice the research methods and planning subject knowledge taught during the year. Dissertations are supervised by a member of Civic Design staff with experience in the specific area of study. The dissertation must be submitted by September 30. For those who are interested in pursuing a PhD degree, this MA programme has obtained full ESRC recognition as a foundation course to progress to a PhD degree and is eligible for ESRC 1+3 research studentships.

The MA in Research Methodology is designed for students and professionals, who have an interest in town and regional planning and wider public policy evaluation, to pursue a broadly-based research training programme. The degree aims to enhance the student's generic research and communication skills and critical analytical ability, complemented by a range of advanced specialised planning and...

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