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Course Description

The course is designed primarily to allow students with an interest in photography to pursue that interest in depth, to learn something new about the medium and, often, about themselves. The course offers time for reflection, experiment and decision-making. It provides resources both in terms of equipment and expertise, as well as stimulating encounters with a wide range of people, photographs and ideas, in an atmosphere of support and constructive criticism. Students finish the course with a focussed body of their own work, a broader perspective on photography as a force in contemporary life, and clearer sense of their own identities as photographic practitioners. How is the course structured? The course is divided into three study blocks. Each block is 15 weeks long for full-time students, and 30 weeks long for part-time students. Full-time students start in October finish Block 1 at the end of January, Block 2 in May, and the degree in September. Part-time students start in October of their first year and complete Study Block 1 in May. They finish Study Block 2 in January and the degree in September of the following academic year. After their first Study Block (30 weeks), part-time students may elect to continue to participate in weekly seminars, or pursue Study Block 2 on a more independent basis. After 60 weeks, they join another cohort of full-time students for the final Study Block and completion of the degree. How is the course taught? The course consists of seminars, lectures, workshops, tutorials and independent study. Required work can be in one (long) day of attendance each week. Incoming full-time and part-time students meet weekly. They participate in one series of seminars investigating photographic practice and another series focusing on theoretical and contextual study. There is, finally, a series of lectures by visiting practitioners, scholars and critics. Tutorials are arranged as needed. The course is delivered by a team of experienced and knowledgeable tutors from a variety of backgrounds. This core team is supplemented by visiting lecturers who provide specialist input from their own particular fields. How is the course assessed? There are two points of formal review and feedback at the ends of Study Blocks 1 and 2, and an assessment at the completion of the degree. The formal reviews do not enter into a ?calculation? for the final assessment they are given to encourage good work and pinpoint difficulties, and are written against the course learning outcomes. The course learning outcomes are divided into four areas: practical theoretical conceptual, and professional. Each of these headings is further divided into specific points (example: under ?professional? one point reads ?manage time and resources effectively?). Written feedback on work submitted for assessment discusses strengths and weaknesses in terms of the outcomes, so that it is easy to see which areas demonstrate strong points and which need further attention. The course tends to emphasise experimentation at the beginning and finished presentation at the end, and for this reason, different learning outcomes as emphasised at different points. However, all learning outcomes apply to both photographic work and written work (photographs can be assessed for evidence of conceptual awareness, and writing can be assessed in terms of professional presentation.) The principle outcome of your studies will be a major photographic project. This could be a gallery exhibition, a publication, website, site-specific installation or other appropriate form of presentation. The final essay that accompanies the work is focussed on that project, yet draws on the understanding you have gained over the entire period of study of both your own practice and its place within the field of photography. Facilities University College Falmouth?s new purpose-built photographic resource centre was completed in 2007. In addition to an extensive range of cameras, including lar

The course is designed primarily to allow students with an interest in photography to pursue that interest in depth, to learn something new about the medium and, often, about themselves. The course offers time for reflection, experiment and decision-making. It provides resources both in terms of equipment and expertise, as well as stimulating encounters with a wide range of people, photographs...

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