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Most Illustration involves an illustrator producing work to a prescribed commercial brief where they are expected to stifle their contribution to form and content, having very little input or control over their work and its usage. The idea behind Illustration: Authorial Practice is that students take responsibility for developing their own ideas and material. They become the author. MA Illustration: Authorial Practice is a studio-based course focused on the development of the authorial voice within illustration. Recent debate has highlighted the need to reassert the characteristics of personal origination, ownership, storytelling and literary ideas within the discipline. This course is broadly addressed to illustrators who have begun to explore the possibilities of authorship, and now wish to expand, extend or focus their interest through reflective study and critical exchange. Speed of communication, access to information and other technological developments mean that the contemporary illustrator is able to live and work almost anywhere. The location of Cornwall offers a number of interesting opportunities for educationalresearch activities such as The Tate St. Ives, The Eden Project, The National Maritime Museum, and a range of other recognised art galleries and centres of interest as well as a rich cultural heritage. The course team is committed to the further development of established links nationally and internationally as well as to establishing new relationships with external bodies interested in extending the boundaries of illustration through authorship and entrepreneurship. How is the course structured? Completion of the course takes one year (45 weeks) in the full-time mode of study, or two years (90 weeks) in the part-time mode. The academic year begins in October and ends in September of the following year. Part-time students have two semesters, rather than one, in which to complete the required work for each of the three study blocks. How is the course taught? This course places emphasis on the integration of all elements of study, recognising that the authorial illustrator needs to be aware of theory and be able to work well with words in order to deliver visual work of quality and interest. The core of the course will be a sequence of three negotiated projects these will be based on illustration work but will be informed by the lectures and seminars running concurrently, with a research journal providing connection and the opportunity to reflect on practice. The projects themselves are proposed and initiated by the individual students, and developed in negotiation with staff and discussion with fellow students. Whilst these are separate projects, they would be expected to demonstrate progression, indicating the research, analysis, reflection and experiment necessary for a successful and distinctive piece of authorial illustration. MA project work will be exhibited in a final show, which would hopefully include the means and nature of its publication or appearance in the public domain. Discussion and evaluation will take place in the seminars related to the series of lectures that run through the first two components of the course. The lectures will consider authorial positions the theories that help define and explain them, their contexts, and how and where work might be placed in the public domain. The ensuing seminars will enable students to discuss and evaluate each other?s work in relation to the theories and analysis put forward in the lectures. Students will produce three analytical essays whilst on the course: covering the authorial context for their practice, consideration for audience, and a report describing the processes and development of their practice. This studio practice is recorded in a research journal, which is seen as a vital tool for the reflective practitioner. This will normally comprise a visual and written record of the practical development of each negotiated project, and will be i

Most Illustration involves an illustrator producing work to a prescribed commercial brief where they are expected to stifle their contribution to form and content, having very little input or control over their work and its usage. The idea behind Illustration: Authorial Practice is that students take responsibility for developing their own ideas and material. They become the author. MA...

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