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Course Description

This is an interdisciplinary, research-based programme offered by a consortium of six European universities: University of Leipzig, University of Ghent, University of Vienna, University of Wroclaw, University of Roskilde and LSE.

This is a wide-ranging academic programme which combines global economic history, international studies, area studies, and social science approaches to the study of globalisation processes. You will spend one of the two years of the programme at one of the partner institutes.  Students attending LSE follow the MSc Global Economic History (Erasmus Mundus).

Courses consider the origin and outcomes of distinct patterns of economic growth in various times and parts of the world. The programme also seeks to explain the rise in international economic inequality since the nineteenth century, why the economic growth impulse in modern times was strong in some world regions and weaker in others, and why large parts of the world are still trapped in poverty, stagnation and instability.

This is an interdisciplinary, research-based programme offered by a consortium of six European universities: University of Leipzig, University of Ghent, University of Vienna, University of Wroclaw, University of Roskilde and LSE. This is a wide-ranging academic programme which combines global economic history, international studies, area studies, and social science approaches to the...

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Course Content

You will study for two years, one year each at two of the partner institutes, and you will choose whether to spend your first or your second year at LSE.

LSE

During your time at LSE you will take compulsory courses to the value of two and a half units, and either optional courses to the value of one unit and a half-unit dissertation, or optional courses to the value of a half unit and a full unit dissertation.

(* denotes a half unit)

Economic Change in Global History: Approaches and Analysis*
Introduces central themes and analytical tools in global history, focussing on the history of material progress and stasis, and considering the comparisons and connections between the histories of different regions of the world.

Two from:
Pre-modern Paths of Growth: East and West compared, c1000-1800

Surveys long-term processes of growth and development in pre-modern Europe and the wider world.
The Development and Integration of the World Economy in the 19th and 20th centuries
Aims to provide an overview of the development and integration of the world economy since the First Industrial Revolution.
Empire, Colonialism and Globalisation
Explores the history and historiography of empires since the fifteenth century, and their legacy for our world today.

If you are studying at LSE in your first year, you will take:
Dissertation in Global History*

An independent research project of 6,000 words on an approved topic of your choice.
And
Courses to the value of one unit from a range of economic history options

If you are studying at LSE in your second year, you will take:
Dissertation in Global History

An independent research project of 10,000 words on an approved topic of your choice.
And
One half-unit from a range of economic history options

Partner university

For information on courses taken at your chosen partner institution, please see the University of Leipzig’s website.

You can find the most up-to-date list of optional courses in the Programme Regulations section of the current School Calendar.

You must note however that while care has been taken to ensure that this information is up to date and correct, a change of circumstances since publication may cause the School to change, suspend or withdraw a course or programme of study, or change the fees that apply to it. The School will always notify the affected parties as early as practicably possible and propose any viable and relevant alternative options. Note that that the School will neither be liable for information that after publication becomes inaccurate or irrelevant, nor for changing, suspending or withdrawing a course or programme of study due to events outside of its control, which includes but is not limited to a lack of demand for a course or programme of study, industrial action, fire, flood or other environmental or physical damage to premises.

You must also note that places are limited on some courses and/or subject to specific entry requirements. The School cannot therefore guarantee you a place. Please note that changes to programmes and courses can sometimes occur after you have accepted your offer of a place. These changes are normally made in light of developments in the discipline or path-breaking research, or on the basis of student feedback. Changes can take the form of altered course content, teaching formats or assessment modes. Any such changes are intended to enhance the student learning experience. 

You will study for two years, one year each at two of the partner institutes, and you will choose whether to spend your first or your second year at LSE. LSE During your time at LSE you will take compulsory courses to the value of two and a half units, and either optional courses to the value of one unit and a half-unit dissertation, or optional courses to the value of a...

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Entry Requirements

Upper second class honours (2:1) degree or equivalent in social science or humanities. Excellent written and oral command of English and at least basic German knowledge.

Competition for places on the programme is high. This means that even if you meet our minimum entry requirement, this does not guarantee you an offer of admission.

Upper second class honours (2:1) degree or equivalent in social science or humanities. Excellent written and oral command of English and at least basic German knowledge.

Competition for places on the programme is high. This means that even if you meet our minimum entry requirement, this does not guarantee you an offer of admission.

Assessment Methods

All taught courses are required to include formative coursework which is unassessed. It is designed to help prepare you for summative assessment which counts towards the course mark and to the degree award. LSE uses a range of formative assessment, such as essays, problem sets, case studies, reports, quizzes, mock exams and many others. Summative assessment may be conducted during the course or by final examination at the end of the course. An indication of the formative coursework and summative assessment for each course can be found in the relevant course guide.

All taught courses are required to include formative coursework which is unassessed. It is designed to help prepare you for summative assessment which counts towards the course mark and to the degree award. LSE uses a range of formative assessment, such as essays, problem sets, case studies, reports, quizzes, mock exams and many others. Summative assessment may be conducted during the course...

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Additional Information

UK/EU students: £14,088 (2019 at LSE)
Overseas students: £21,744 (2019 at LSE)
UK/EU students: £14,640 (2020 at LSE) - provisional
Overseas students: £22,608 (2020 at LSE) - provisional

Other fees apply for the time spent at the partner institution.

Fee status

The amount of tuition fees you will need to pay, and any financial support you are eligible for, will depend on whether you are classified as a home (UK/EU) or overseas student, otherwise known as your fee status. LSE assesses your fee status based on guidelines provided by the Department of Education.

We will publish further information about the fee status for continuing students, particularly those from the EU, as soon as information is available from the UK government.

UK/EU students: £14,088 (2019 at LSE) Overseas students: £21,744 (2019 at LSE) UK/EU students: £14,640 (2020 at LSE) - provisional Overseas students: £22,608 (2020 at LSE) - provisional Other fees apply for the time spent at the partner institution. Fee status The amount of tuition fees you...

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