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Full Time Business Administration and Management Top-Up (BA Hons)

St Helens College

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Course Description

Introduction Biological MonitoringBiological monitoring is a useful tool for occupational hygiene and health professionals. It is based on the analysis of hazardous substances or their metabolites in urine, blood or breath and is used to assess exposure by inhalation, ingestion and absorption through the skin. Biological monitoring for workers significantly exposed to lead (as defined in the Control of Lead at Work Regulations 2002 (as amended)) is compulsory. For all other substances biological monitoring is voluntary but it has roles under CoSHH for Exposure Assessment (reg 10) and Health Surveillance (reg 11). Biological monitoring is particularly valuable where substances may be absorbed through the skin or where control of exposure relies on personal protective equipment. It can also be used to investigate the behavioural aspects of exposure controls. A further benefit is the ?personal' nature of biological monitoring: results can be used to give workers reassurance about their exposure and risk of ill health. This workshop is an overview of biological monitoring and how it can enhance the service occupational hygiene and health professionals offer. The event has been accredited with CPD points by the Faculty of Occupational Medicine. Biological Monitoring and HSL HSL has been involved in much of the biological monitoring sample and data analysis used to set UK biological guidance values and is responsible for producing and providing information sheets on these guidance values. HSL is the foremost laboratory in the UK for biological monitoring of occupational exposure conducting extensive research as well as providing a comprehensive analytical service and has representatives on UK and international standard setting bodies. HSL analyses over 8000 samples per year for over 100 different chemicals and our customers include HSE and occupational hygiene and health providers. What can you expect? The programme will start with an introduction to biological monitoring - what it is, why do it, where it fits into the regulations and how it can help you assess chemical exposure and the risk of ill-health followed by biological effect monitoring and other laboratory tests. Practical examples of biological monitoring will then be illustrated through case studies and a session will cover the interpretation of results. After lunch, there will be a session on ?Making the case for biological monitoring' and a tour of areas of the laboratory to look at biological monitoring and related topics. The day will conclude with an informal forum to allow questions and discussion of issues with HSL scientists.

Introduction Biological MonitoringBiological monitoring is a useful tool for occupational hygiene and health professionals. It is based on the analysis of hazardous substances or their metabolites in urine, blood or breath and is used to assess exposure by inhalation, ingestion and absorption through the skin. Biological monitoring for workers significantly exposed to lead (as defined in the...

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