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Course Description

Exciting new opportunities for chemical intervention in disease have emerged based on a greater understanding of the molecular aspects of disease progression. Drug discovery combines the expertise of medicinal chemists required in translating the understanding of the molecular aspects of disease progression to the identification of suitable chemical entities, and the process of optimisation that ultimately leads to the discovery of new medicines.

This exciting course run by the Institute of Cancer Therapeutics is designed to provide you with a 'state-of-the-art' education in modern drug discovery, which meets the demand of employers in the pharmaceutical industry.

Opportunities to learn the latest innovations in drug discovery are provided, including computer-aided drug design and techniques in parallel synthesis, as well as electronic data management.

Exciting new opportunities for chemical intervention in disease have emerged based on a greater understanding of the molecular aspects of disease progression. Drug discovery combines the expertise of medicinal chemists required in translating the understanding of the molecular aspects of disease progression to the identification of suitable chemical entities, and the process of optimisation...

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Course Content

The programme has a central core of modules in the first Semester which are designed to train students in widely-used laboratory techniques, research methodology, and in critical analysis and thinking.

The 20-credit Practical Skills in Research module is designed around common laboratory techniques and skills including ELISA, flow cytometry, Western Blot, statistical analysis etc. You will have a series of workshops to learn these techniques with a lab session where you carry out the procedure.

In the 20-credit Critical Appraisal module, you are assigned a topic under the supervision of one of our academics and are asked to write a 5000-word critical review. In this module, students will receive a wide range of training and advice on scientific writing, compiling scientific data, data analysis, scientific presentation etc.

The remaining 20-credit first semester module entitled Principles of Drug Discovery provides students with the core academic knowledge required in this field. During the first semester, students gain knowledge of the breadth of cutting-edge research at ICT and either choose or suggest a research project plan.

In Semester 2, students will study 20-credit Preclinical Models for Drug Evaluation designed around protocols and techniques used in the in vitro and in vivo evaluation of drug potency and 20-credit Case Studies in Drug Discovery module designed around recent advances in development of new medicines.

The remaining 20-credit module can be chosen from a list of topics which reflect your career aspirations. These include Molecular Mechanisms of Toxicity, Chemical Toolbox for Drug Discovery, Innovation in Life Science Industry.

In Semester 3 (60-credits each), students will join research laboratories within the ICT, to undertake their 60-credit Research Project module. During this time, students are trained in specialist laboratory techniques and conduct their chosen research.

Modules

Core

Principles of Drug Discovery (INC7014-B)

Practical Skills in Pharmacology Research (INC7018-B)

Critical Appraisal of a Current Topic in Oncology and Toxicology (INC7017-B)

Case Studies in Drug Discovery (INC7011-B)

Cancer Therapeutics Research Project (INC7019-E)

Option

Toxicology and Safety Pharmacology (INC7005-B)

Molecular Basis of Cancer and Cancer Therapy (INC7002-B)

Preclinical Models for Drug Evaluation (INC7001-B)

Chemical Toolbox for Drug Discovery (INC7016-B)

Molecular Mechanisms of Toxicity (INC7009-B)

The programme has a central core of modules in the first Semester which are designed to train students in widely-used laboratory techniques, research methodology, and in critical analysis and thinking. The 20-credit Practical Skills in Research module is designed around common laboratory techniques and skills including ELISA, flow cytometry, Western Blot, statistical analysis etc....

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Entry Requirements

To be admitted to the programme, applicants must have an undergraduate Honours qualification (minimum 2: 2) or equivalent in a scientific discipline, usually within chemistry, biology, pharmacy, biomedicine, or related fields. Candidates who do not meet these entry criteria but who can show relevant experience may also be considered.

For North American students a GPA of normally 2.0 and above (on a scale of 4.0), or an equivalent, is required.

A levels

Entry to this programme requires a pass at A-level Chemistry OR having taken an undergraduate module in a relevant chemical subject.

English language requirements

If your native language is not English, or the official language of your first degree is not English, you will need to pass a test in English approved by the University before you can be admitted. The International English Language Testing System test (IELTS) administered by the British Council is the test which is preferred by the University.

You will need to achieve an overall score of at least 6.0, with at least 5.5 in each of the four sub-tests (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Testing facilities are available at most British Council overseas offices. When you take the test, you should ask for a copy of your Test Report Form to be sent to the University.

Alternative English language tests include:

  • The Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE-A), for which you will need to achieve an overall score of at least 55, with at least 51 in each of the four sub-tests
  • TOEFL, for which you will need to score at least 80 on the internet-based test, with sub-tests not less than Speaking 20, Listening 17, Reading 18, Writing 17

If you do not meet the IELTS requirement, you can take a University of Bradford pre-sessional English course. See the Language Centre for more details.

If you do not meet the IELTS requirement, you can take a University of Bradford pre-sessional English course. 

To be admitted to the programme, applicants must have an undergraduate Honours qualification (minimum 2: 2) or equivalent in a scientific discipline, usually within chemistry, biology, pharmacy, biomedicine, or related fields. Candidates who do not meet these entry criteria but who can show relevant experience may also be considered. For North American students a GPA of normally 2.0...

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Assessment Methods

A wide variety of teaching methods appropriate to the learning outcomes of the individual modules are employed throughout the programme, and are supported by the virtual learning environment provided by the University.

You will experience lectures from ICT research/teaching staff and visiting clinicians and industrial researchers, small group workshops, one-to-one tutorials and practical classes. You will also attend the Institute of Cancer Therapeutics Research Seminar programme.

Self-directed independent learning forms a significant component at MSc level; you will be supported to develop the attributes and skills needed for life-long learning and continued professional development. Directed private study will involve a variety of activities, which include directed reading of selected textbooks and specified source literature, use of the virtual learning environment (directed web-based materials), report writing, preparing presentations to deliver to peers, and other assignments.

A wide variety of teaching methods appropriate to the learning outcomes of the individual modules are employed throughout the programme, and are supported by the virtual learning environment provided by the University. You will experience lectures from ICT research/teaching staff and visiting clinicians and industrial researchers, small group workshops, one-to-one tutorials and...

Read More