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Course Description

The Diploma in Theology, Ministry and Mission takes two years to complete when studied full time and is accredited by Durham University.

Most Trinity students are over the age of 21; however, if you’re a school leaver who is interested in studying with us then just get in touch with our admissions team who will talk with you about your options. Although most candidates will need to have at least two A levels, or equivalent, greater weight is placed on references, interviews and other evidence of motivation and academic ability. International students need to have an IELTS (International English Language Test Score) of 6.5 and the English language test must have been taken within the last two years.

The Diploma is assessed at Levels 4 and 5 and you’re required to take enough modules to add up to 240 credits (120 credits in each year of study). 

The Diploma in Theology, Ministry and Mission takes two years to complete when studied full time and is accredited by Durham University. Most Trinity students are over the age of 21; however, if you’re a school leaver who is interested in studying with us then just get in touch with our admissions team who will talk with you...

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Assessment Methods

The purpose of assessments is to ensure that you have achieved the learning outcomes of the module. While the teaching takes place in the classroom, your learning will also take place in preparatory reading or other activities for classes, the reading and thinking that is involved in the writing of your assessment, the feedback from a marked piece of work, in informal conversation and discussion with other students and with faculty.

Students can usually choose an essay or other assessment task from a range of options that will be given to the class at the beginning of the module. The length of the essay will be specified in terms of a word count and assignments will have an indicative reading list. In many cases the assessment takes the form of an essay. However, some modules require other forms of assessment that allow for greater creativity, different learning styles and, above all, which ensure that you make connections between the learning of the module and practical experience and ministry.

Examples of other kinds of assessment might include:

  • a response to a case study
  • a learning journal
  • a sermon
  • a theological reflection on a critical incident
  • a group presentation for a specific context
  • preparing a liturgy for a special occasion
  • a book review
  • writing an imaginary dialogue of a pastoral situation
  • lay training programme for developing skills in pastoral care among church members
  • a portfolio

Guidelines

General guidelines for the different types of assessment can be found on Moodle or on the following link: dur.ac.uk/common.awards/assessment/guidelines. If you are not sure, do not hesitate to ask for clarification from the module tutor. In general, however, tutors do not read outlines or drafts of essays.

The amount of time that you spend completing an assessment is directly proportional to the credit-weighting of the module: an assignment for a 20-credit module should take twice as long to prepare as an assignment for a 10-credit module. Some modules require more than one assignment, or are assessed by examination.

Assessment Criteria

The most important aspect of an assessment is the learning that you have done in completing it, not the mark that you receive! It is good to remember that the purpose of your assignment is to demonstrate to yourself and to the reader that you have a good grasp of the subject matter and a clear and persuasive answer to the question posed by the title or task.

Students should familiarise themselves with the detailed marking criteria which are available on Moodle and on the following link: dur.ac.uk/common.awards/assessment/criteria. Students must make sure that assignments follow the conventions stated in the Style Guide found on Moodle.

You will receive more detailed assessment information through our Student Handbook when you begin your studies at Trinity.

The purpose of assessments is to ensure that you have achieved the learning outcomes of the module. While the teaching takes place in the classroom, your learning will also take place in preparatory reading or other activities for classes, the reading and thinking that is involved in the writing of your assessment, the feedback from a marked piece of work, in informal conversation and...

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Student Satisfaction

Source: NSS

Overall student satisfaction
100%
of students were satisfied overall
The teaching on my course
100% of students strongly agree that staff are good explaining things
100% of students strongly agree that staff have made the subject interesting
100% of students strongly agree that the course is intellectually stimulating
89% of students strongly agree that the course has challenged them to achieve their best work
Learning opportunities
100% of students strongly agree that the course has provided them with opportunities to explore ideas or concepts in depth
100% of students strongly agree that the course has provided them with opportunities to bring information and ideas together from different topics
70% of students strongly agree that the course has provided them with opportunities to apply what they have learnt
Assessment and feedback
100% of students strongly agree that the criteria used in marking have been clear in advance
100% of students strongly agree that the marking and assessment has been fair
95% of students strongly agree that the teedback on their work has been timely
90% of students strongly agree that they have received helpful comments on my work
Academic support
100% of students strongly agree that they have been able to contact staff when they needed to
95% of students strongly agree that they have received sufficient advice and guidance in relation to their course
80% of students strongly agree that good advice was available when they needed to make study choices on their course
Organisation and management
100% of students strongly agree that the course is well organised and running smoothly
95% of students strongly agree that the timetable works efficiently for them
95% of students strongly agree that any changes in the course or teaching have been communicated effectively
Learning resources
90% of students strongly agree that the IT resources and facilities provided have supported their learning well
95% of students strongly agree that the library resources (e.g. books, online services and learning spaces) have supported their learning well
89% of students strongly agree that they have been able to 3ess course-specific resources (e.g. equipment, facilities, software, collections) when they needed to
Learning community
95% of students strongly agree that they feel part of a community of staff and students
95% of students strongly agree that they have had the right opportunities to work with other students as part of their course
Student voice
100% of students strongly agree that they have had the right opportunities to provide feedback on their course
100% of students strongly agree that staff value students’ views and opinions about the course
60% of students strongly agree that it is clear how students’ feedback on the course has been acted on
89% of students strongly agree that the students’ union (association or guild) effectively represents students’ academic interests

University TEF Outcome

Did not participate.

Statistics

Source: hesa.ac.uk

  • UCAS Points0

  • Employment Rate100%

  • Average Graduate SalaryN/A

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