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Course Description

Physiology is the study of how the body works. More than any other of the biological sciences, it involves using an understanding of biological process at the most basic level to explain how a whole organ or an entire body functions. It is this integrated aspect that puts Physiology at the centre of the biological and medical sciences.

Physiological studies of normal biological function provide the basis for understanding the abnormal function observed in human and animal disease and for developing new therapeutic treatments. The scope of physiology ranges from investigation of molecular actions in single cells to studying the way our body systems control our ability to think, eat, sleep and perform exercise. To achieve this, Physiologists must also use the related disciplines of anatomy, biochemistry, pharmacology, genetics and immunology.

Physiology is the study of how the body works. More than any other of the biological sciences, it involves using an understanding of biological process at the most basic level to explain how a whole organ or an entire body functions. It is this integrated aspect that puts Physiology at the centre of the biological and medical sciences. Physiological studies of normal biological...

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Course Content

A degree in Physiology is taught via a selection of compulsory and optional courses to enhance your learning and prepare you for a future career or further study. In each year you will take courses adding up to 120 credits. Depending on the number of compulsory and optional courses offered by your degree, you can also choose other eligible courses which fit your timetable.

  • Year 1

In year 1 you will take courses in Medical Sciences and Chemistry for Life Sciences plus additional courses selected from science and other areas.

Compulsory Courses

Introduction to Medical Sciences (SM1001) - 15 Credit Points

Chemistry for the Life Sciences 1 (CM1020) - 15 Credit Points

The Cell (SM1501) - 15 Credit Points

Chemistry for the Life Sciences 2 (CM1512) - 15 Credit Points

Professional Skills Part 1 (PD1001)

Optional Courses

Select a further 60 credit points from courses of choice.

  • Year 2

In year 2 Human Physiology courses commence. Parallel recommended courses include Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, combined with courses delivering key skills applicable to Physiology.

Compulsory Courses

Physiology of Human Cells (BI20B2) - 15 Credit Points

Molecular Biology of the Gene (BI20M3) - 15 Credit Points

Foundation Skills for Medical Sciences (SM2001) - 15 Credit Points

Physiology of Human Organ Systems (BI25B2) - 15 Credit Points

Energy for Life (BI25M7) - 15 Credit Points

Research Skills for Medical Sciences (SM2501) - 15 Credit Points

Optional Courses

Select a further 30 credit points from courses of choice.

  • Year 3

Courses taken in year 3 enhance your understanding of the major physiological systems within the mammalian body and provide detailed insights into specific areas of mainstream physiology.

Compulsory Courses

Integrative Physiology (PY3002) - 30 Credit Points

Cardiovascular Physiology and Pharmacology (BM3501) - 15 Credit Points

Neuroscience and Neuropharmacology (BM3502) - 15 Credit Points

Epithelial Physiology (PY3803) - 15 Credit Points

Neuroscience Research Topics (BM3804) - 15 Credit Points

Optional Courses

Select a further 30 credit points from courses of choice.

  • Year 4

The Honours year aims to explore in depth, specific aspects of physiology. An important feature is the ten-week research project, carried out in research laboratories at the University or in local research institutes.

Compulsory Courses

Advanced Molecules, Membranes and Cells (BM4004) - 30 Credit Points

Staying Alive - Adaptation in Physiological Systems (BM4009) - 15 Credit Points

Physiology Project (PY4501) - 60 Credit Points

Optional Courses

Select one of the following:

  • Developmental Neuroscience (PY4302)
  • The Science of Ageing - From Cradle to Grave (BM4301)

Developmental Neuroscience (PY4302) - 15 Credit Points

The Science of Ageing - from Cradle to Grave (BM4301) - 15 Credit Points

A degree in Physiology is taught via a selection of compulsory and optional courses to enhance your learning and prepare you for a future career or further study. In each year you will take courses adding up to 120 credits. Depending on the number of compulsory and optional courses offered by your degree, you can also choose other eligible courses which fit your...

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Entry Requirements

SQA Highers

Standard: AABB*

Applicants who have achieved AABB (or better), are encouraged to apply and will be considered. Good performance in additional Highers/ Advanced Highers may be required.

Minimum: BBB*

Applicants who have achieved BBB (or are on course to achieve this by the end of S5) are encouraged to apply and will be considered. Good performance in additional Highers/Advanced Highers will normally be required.

Adjusted: BB*

Applicants who have achieved BB, and who meet one of the widening participation criteria are encouraged to apply and will be considered. Good performance in additional Highers/Advanced Highers will be required.

* Including good performance in at least two Mathematics/ Science subjects by the end of your senior phase of education.

More information on our definition of Standard, Minimum and Adjusted entry qualifications.

A LEVELS

Standard: BBB*

Minimum: BBC*

Adjusted: CCC*

* Including good performance in at least two Mathematics/ Science subjects by the end of your senior phase of education.

More information on our definition of Standard, Minimum and Adjusted entry qualifications.

International Baccalaureate

32 points, including 5, 5, 5 at HL*.

* Including good performance in at least two Mathematics/ Science subjects by the end of your senior phase of education.

Irish Leaving Certificate

5H with 3 at H2 AND 2 at H3 OR AAABB*, obtained in a single sitting. (B must be at B2 or above)

* Including good performance in at least two Mathematics/ Science subjects by the end of your senior phase of education.

Entry from College

Advanced entry to this degree may be possible from some HNC/HND qualifications, please see www.abdn.ac.uk/study/articulation for more details.

English Language Requirements

To study for an Undergraduate degree at the University of Aberdeen it is essential that you can speak, understand, read, and write English fluently. The minimum requirements for this degree are as follows:

IELTS Academic:

OVERALL - 6.0 with: Listening - 5.5; Reading - 5.5; Speaking - 5.5; Writing - 6.0

TOEFL iBT:

OVERALL - 78 with: Listening - 17; Reading - 18; Speaking - 20; Writing - 21

PTE Academic:

OVERALL - 54 with: Listening - 51; Reading - 51; Speaking - 51; Writing - 54

Cambridge English Advanced & Proficiency:

OVERALL - 169 with: Listening - 162; Reading - 162; Speaking - 162; Writing - 169

SQA Highers Standard: AABB* Applicants who have achieved AABB (or better), are encouraged to apply and will be considered. Good performance in additional Highers/ Advanced Highers may be required. Minimum: BBB* Applicants who have achieved BBB (or are on course to achieve this by the end of S5) are...

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Assessment Methods

Students are assessed by any combination of three assessment methods:

  • coursework such as essays and reports completed throughout the course;
  • practical assessments of the skills and competencies learnt on the course; and
  • written examinations at the end of each course.

The exact mix of these methods differs between subject areas, year of study and individual courses.

Honours projects are typically assessed on the basis of a written dissertation.

Students are assessed by any combination of three assessment methods: coursework such as essays and reports completed throughout the course; practical assessments of the skills and competencies learnt on the course; and written examinations at the end of each course. The exact mix of these methods differs between subject areas, year of...

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