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Biomedical Science MRes

St George's University of London

  • 30 Jun 2020 Start Date

  • 1 year Duration

  • Full Time Study Mode

  • £13250.00 Course Fee

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Course Description

Biomedical scientists work at the cutting edge of research and medicine, helping to solve some of the most threatening diseases and conditions facing humanity. St George’s boasts a renowned heritage in this field, constantly developing new and innovative ways to diagnose, prevent and treat numerous diseases. Edward Jenner, the ‘father of immunology’ who successfully performed the first vaccination against smallpox, was based at St George’s. More recently, our research has included a focus on tuberculosis, malaria and HIV in low and middle-income countries.

This pathway will give you the opportunity to study antimicrobial resistance, with a focus on healthcare impact, genetic technologies and interventions to reduce antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Specific topics will include AMR in tuberculosis, MRSA, sexually transmitted infections and HIV. There will be an opportunity to learn bioinformatics techniques and the enormous impact that genetics is having on understanding epidemiology, selection and evolution of AMR pathogens. There will be a series of sessions focusing on strategies to reduce AMR, such as rapid diagnostics, stewardship, dosing, new drugs, vaccines and phage.

This course will provide you with the skills, knowledge and experience for a rewarding career in biomedical science or to progress on to a fulfilling research degree such as a PhD. 

Biomedical scientists work at the cutting edge of research and medicine, helping to solve some of the most threatening diseases and conditions facing humanity. St George’s boasts a renowned heritage in this field, constantly developing new and innovative ways to diagnose, prevent and treat numerous diseases. Edward Jenner, the ‘father of immunology’ who successfully...

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Course Content

On the Antimicrobial Resistance pathway you will be taught the essentials of conducting high quality research through a range of core modules, and will gain a detailed knowledge of antimicrobial resistance before undertaking your research project. 

The MRes is made up of 180 credits. All modules are compulsory, and will equip you with the skills and knowledge to conduct high quality research. 

Core modules

Research methods15 credits

Statistics15 credits

Research project planning and management15 credits

Research project105 credits

Specialist module - Antimicrobial Resistance

The 30 credit specialist module will give you the opportunity to study antimicrobial resistance (AMR), with a particular focus on healthcare impact, genetic technologies, and interventions to reduce AMR. You will explore the major AMR problems, and the strategies needed to reduce the current and future AMR burden.

You will gain insight into how different interventions may be more effective in reducing different AMR pathogens, and will take advantage of active research at St George’s to work on specific topics, including AMR in tuberculosis, MRSA, sexually transmitted infections and HIV.

There will be an opportunity to learn about bioinformatics techniques, new sequencing technologies and ‘omics’ methodologies, and the enormous impact that genetics is having on understanding the epidemiology, selection and evolution of AMR pathogens. There will be a series of sessions focusing on strategies to reduce AMR such as rapid diagnostics, antibiotic stewardship, dosing, new drugs, vaccines and phage applications.

On the Antimicrobial Resistance pathway you will be taught the essentials of conducting high quality research through a range of core modules, and will gain a detailed knowledge of antimicrobial resistance before undertaking your research project.  The MRes is made up of 180 credits. All modules are compulsory, and will equip you with the skills and knowledge to conduct high...

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Available Dates

Location Start Date Price  

Classroom

Cranmer Terrace

Full Time, 1 year

30/06/2020

(229 days left)

£13250.00

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Entry Requirements

You will need to meet both the entry and personal statement criteria to be considered for this course. All qualifications must have been awarded within the last five years (including the year of application).

Undergraduate degree or equivalent*

You should normally have, or be expected to achieve, at least a minimum of a second class degree (2:2) in a biomedical science or a science-related subject (or an equivalent overseas qualification).

*Must be completed, awarded and certified by 1 August 2019.

If you are invited for an interview you may be asked to write a short paper (no more than one page) on a subject associated with biomedical research as part of the application process. 

International qualifications

We accept equivalent qualifications gained in other countries. Please see the country-specific information section of our website or contact us on study@sgul.ac.uk if your country is not listed.

English Language

If your native language is not English, you will need to provide evidence of your English language ability.    

English language tests are valid for only two years, as English language ability changes from year to year. If you've completed a test which is now considered out of date, you may be required to complete another, though applicants are only permitted a maximum of two test attempts within one year.

You will need to meet both the entry and personal statement criteria to be considered for this course. All qualifications must have been awarded within the last five years (including the year of application). Undergraduate degree or equivalent* You should normally have, or be expected to achieve, at least a minimum of a second class degree (2:2) in a...

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Assessment Methods

Assessments are designed to help students with preparation for their dissertation. They help you review published work critically, use appropriate experimental design, and analyse experimental data. They also enable you to develop scientific writing and presentation skills.

All modules are assessed through written assignments or an oral presentation, with the exception of the statistics module which is assessed via examination. The optional modules require the submission of written reports. Following the research project, you will be asked to present a poster on your research.

Assessments are designed to help students with preparation for their dissertation. They help you review published work critically, use appropriate experimental design, and analyse experimental data. They also enable you to develop scientific writing and presentation skills. All modules are assessed through written assignments or an oral presentation, with the exception of the...

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