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Course Description

Come and explore some of the most profound questions it is possible to ask with some of the most eminent philosophers in the country. What makes something good or just? Is the human mind just a lump of grey matter? Can I know that I'm not trapped inside The Matrix? Do we have free will? Does God exist? Does science provide us with a special kind of knowledge? Who decides what counts as beautiful?

This prestigious degree provides a thorough grounding in the central areas of philosophy for students from all educational backgrounds. It fosters independent judgement, original thought and the ability to analyse complex ideas and arguments. It offers a wide range of option modules, with some offered at King's College London (KCL). 

Come and explore some of the most profound questions it is possible to ask with some of the most eminent philosophers in the country. What makes something good or just? Is the human mind just a lump of grey matter? Can I know that I'm not trapped inside The Matrix? Do we have free will? Does God exist? Does science provide us with a special kind of knowledge? Who decides what counts as...

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Course Content

In Year 1, you take four compulsory modules, giving you a rigorous grounding in the central areas of philosophy.

In Years 2 and 3, you take two option modules in each of the Fact, History and Value categories, to ensure a breadth of study across a range of philosophical subjects and methodologies. There are different assessment modes depending on the module level.

  • Fact options concern the nature of reality and how we know about it: What is knowledge? What is the relation between the mind and body? Why is science successful? When are we rational?
  • History options explore the theories and arguments of major figures in the history of philosophy, from Aristotle and Plato to Spinoza and Margaret Cavendish, Hegel and Nietzsche to Adorno and Foucault. Options may offer overviews of different eras or focus on the ideas of specific thinkers.
  • Value options concern questions about what we care about and how we should live, such as: What makes an action right or wrong? What is the best form of government? How does gender matter? Why is art valuable?

In Year 3, you may also write a dissertation on a topic of your choice, or choose two further options.

In Year 1, you take four compulsory modules, giving you a rigorous grounding in the central areas of philosophy. In Years 2 and 3, you take two option modules in each of the Fact, History and Value categories, to ensure a breadth of study across a range of philosophical subjects and methodologies. There are different assessment modes depending on the module...

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Entry Requirements

We welcome applicants without traditional entry qualifications as we base decisions on our own assessment of qualifications, knowledge and previous work experience. We may waive formal entry requirements based on judgement of academic potential.

UCAS TARIFF POINTS

120

The UCAS tariff score is applicable to you if you have recently studied a qualification that has a UCAS tariff equivalence. UCAS provides a tariff calculator for you to work out what your qualification is worth within the UCAS tariff.

FOUNDATION YEAR DEGREES

If you need extra support before starting an undergraduate degree, we offer a BSc Social Sciences with Foundation Year degree, which provides an extra year of supported study. This is an ideal route if you are returning to study after a gap, or if you have not previously studied this subject, or if you did not achieve the grades you need for a place on this degree.

Once you successfully complete the Foundation Year, you will automatically advance onto the main degree.

ALTERNATIVE ENTRY ROUTES

Access to Higher Education Diploma with a minimum of 15 credits achieved at Merit or Distinction in humanities or social science units.

Holders of Birkbeck's Certificate of Higher Education in Philosophy may be considered for entry into the second year. Each case will be considered on its own merits by the Department of Philosophy.

INTERNATIONAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

If English is not your first language or you have not previously studied in English, our usual requirement is the equivalent of an International English Language Testing System (IELTS Academic Test) score of 6.5, with not less than 6.0 in each of the sub-tests.

If you don't meet the minimum IELTS requirement, we offer pre-sessional English courses, foundation programmes and language support services to help you improve your English language skills and get your place at Birkbeck.

VISA REQUIREMENTS

If you are not from the European Economic Area (EEA) and/or Switzerland and you are coming to study in the UK, you may need to apply for a visa.

The visa you apply for varies according to the length of your course:

  • Courses of more than six months' duration.
  • Courses of less than six months' duration.
  • Pre-sessional English language courses.

International students who require a Tier 4 visa should apply for our full-time courses (with the exception of modular enrolment certificates of higher education and graduate certificates), as these qualify for Tier 4 sponsorship. If you are living in the UK on a Tier 4 visa, you will not be eligible to enrol as a student on Birkbeck's part-time courses (with the exception of some modules).

We welcome applicants without traditional entry qualifications as we base decisions on our own assessment of qualifications, knowledge and previous work experience. We may waive formal entry requirements based on judgement of academic potential. UCAS TARIFF POINTS 120 The UCAS tariff score is applicable to you if you have recently studied a...

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Assessment Methods

Assessment is an integral part of your university studies and usually consists of a combination of coursework and examinations, although this will vary from course to course - on some of our courses, assessment is entirely by coursework. The methods of assessment on this course are specified below under 'Methods of assessment on this course'. You will need to allow time to complete coursework and prepare for exams.

Where a course has unseen written examinations, these may be held termly, but, on the majority of our courses, exams are usually taken in the Summer term, during May to June. Exams may be held at other times of the year as well. In most cases, exams are held during the day on a weekday - if you have daytime commitments, you will need to make arrangements for daytime attendance - but some exams are held in the evening. Exam timetables are published online.

Assessment is an integral part of your university studies and usually consists of a combination of coursework and examinations, although this will vary from course to course - on some of our courses, assessment is entirely by coursework. The methods of assessment on this course are specified below under 'Methods of assessment on this course'. You will need to allow time to complete...

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