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Course Description

BA Classical Studies allows you to explore and critically analyse Classical culture, history, archaeology, philosophy and literature. Choosing from a wide range of options, you can study the culture and history of Greek and Roman societies across the Mediterranean and Near East, from the Archaic period to the Roman imperial period and Late Antiquity, and the reception of Classical culture in later periods of history.

You will also be encouraged to engage in wider debate on how we interpret the Classical world and why this matters - debate that is at the forefront of current research in all disciplines of Classical antiquity. In doing so, you will confront both the admirable and the disturbing facets of Greek and Roman cultures, as we delve into democracy, slavery, sexuality and empire.

The BA Classical Studies is a structured programme of taught modules, designed to develop understanding and critical skills and a deep knowledge of Classical history and culture. It involves examining the nature of our knowledge about the past and the way in which histories and texts are written. We encourage you to assess ancient source material (textual and archaeological) and to question accepted histories and traditions about the past, so that you will develop the ability to construct and present a convincing argument.

At Birkbeck we are firm believers that the study of the Classical world should be accessible to all. We attract a wide range of motivated and intellectually curious students of many different ages and backgrounds who enjoy learning and discussion in evening lectures and seminars. Many of our students have no prior knowledge of either Greek or Latin. As part of this degree you will take at least one language option at a suitable level, often beginner level, and you will have the opportunity to develop your language skills over the duration of your degree.

This course is also available for part-time evening study over four years.

BA Classical Studies allows you to explore and critically analyse Classical culture, history, archaeology, philosophy and literature. Choosing from a wide range of options, you can study the culture and history of Greek and Roman societies across the Mediterranean and Near East, from the Archaic period to the Roman imperial period and Late Antiquity, and the reception of Classical culture in...

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Course Content

The programme consists of 11 modules (including a double-weighted dissertation), making a total of 360 credits.

In Year 1, you take one compulsory module (Approaching the Past), two Level 4 option modules (usually including The Ancient World) and one Level 4 (beginner), 5 (intermediate) or 6 (advanced) language option module.

In Year 2, you take two compulsory modules (Exploring the Past and Journeys to the Underworld in Classical Literature and Culture) and two Level 5 option modules, OR one compulsory module (Exploring the Past), two Level 5 option modules and one Level 6 option module - in either case you can tailor your option choices to suit your particular interests (whether in literature, history, language, archaeology or philosophy).

In Year 3, you take one compulsory module (Journeys to the Underworld in Classical Literature and Culture - if not taken in Year 2) and one Level 6 option module OR two Level 6 option modules (again tailored to your particular interests), and you write a dissertation.

Language modules are taught at a number of levels of difficulty and analysis, and students who have no prior knowledge of Classical languages will be able to take a beginners' class.

YEAR 1 COMPULSORY MODULE

  • Approaching the Past

YEAR 2 COMPULSORY MODULES

  • Exploring the Past
  • Journeys to the Underworld in Classical Literature and Culture

YEAR 3 COMPULSORY MODULES

  • Journeys to the Underworld in Classical Literature and Culture
  • Writing the Past: Dissertation

INDICATIVE GREEK AND LATIN MODULES

  • Advanced Greek Language
  • Advanced Latin Language
  • Greek set book (A)
  • Intermediate Greek
  • Intermediate Latin
  • Introduction to Ancient Greek
  • Introduction to Latin
  • Latin set book (A)

INDICATIVE LEVEL 4 OPTION MODULES

  • Discovering Archaeology: From Field to Finds Room
  • The Ancient World
  • The Archaeology of Greece and Rome

INDICATIVE LEVEL 5 OPTION MODULES

  • Beginnings: The Archaeology of Prehistory
  • Between God and Rome: the Byzantine Empire 307-1453
  • Crossing Borders: Passports, Bodies and the State, 1600 to Today
  • From Ancient to Medieval Societies, Third to Eleventh Centuries

INDICATIVE LEVEL 6 OPTION MODULES

  • The Athenian Empire
  • The Empire of Letters: Correspondence in the Roman World

The programme consists of 11 modules (including a double-weighted dissertation), making a total of 360 credits. In Year 1, you take one compulsory module (Approaching the Past), two Level 4 option modules (usually including The Ancient World) and one Level 4 (beginner), 5 (intermediate) or 6 (advanced) language option module. In Year 2, you take two compulsory modules...

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Entry Requirements

We welcome applicants without traditional entry qualifications as we base decisions on our own assessment of qualifications, knowledge and previous work experience. We may waive formal entry requirements based on judgement of academic potential.

UCAS TARIFF POINTS

112. No A-level in Greek or Latin is required.

The UCAS tariff score is applicable to you if you have recently studied a qualification that has a UCAS tariff equivalence. UCAS provides a tariff calculator for you to work out what your qualification is worth within the UCAS tariff.

FOUNDATION YEAR DEGREES

If you need extra support before starting an undergraduate degree, we offer a BSc Social Sciences with Foundation Year degree, which provides an extra year of supported study. This is an ideal route if you are returning to study after a gap, or if you have not previously studied this subject, or if you did not achieve the grades you need for a place on this degree.

Once you successfully complete the Foundation Year, you will automatically advance onto the main degree.

ALTERNATIVE ENTRY ROUTES

Access to Higher Education Diploma with a minimum of 15 credits achieved at Merit or Distinction in humanities or social science units.

INTERNATIONAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

If English is not your first language or you have not previously studied in English, our usual requirement is the equivalent of an International English Language Testing System (IELTS Academic Test) score of 6.5, with not less than 6.0 in each of the sub-tests.

If you don’t meet the minimum IELTS requirement, we offer pre-sessional English courses, foundation programmes and language support services to help you improve your English language skills and get your place at Birkbeck.

Visit the International section of our website to find out more about our English language entry requirements and relevant requirements by country.

VISA REQUIREMENTS

If you are not from the European Economic Area (EEA) and/or Switzerland and you are coming to study in the UK, you may need to apply for a visa.

The visa you apply for varies according to the length of your course:

  • Courses of more than six months' duration.
  • Courses of less than six months' duration.
  • Pre-sessional English language courses.

International students who require a Tier 4 visa should apply for our full-time courses (with the exception of modular enrolment certificates of higher education and graduate certificates), as these qualify for Tier 4 sponsorship. If you are living in the UK on a Tier 4 visa, you will not be eligible to enrol as a student on Birkbeck's part-time courses (with the exception of some modules).

We welcome applicants without traditional entry qualifications as we base decisions on our own assessment of qualifications, knowledge and previous work experience. We may waive formal entry requirements based on judgement of academic potential. UCAS TARIFF POINTS 112. No A-level in Greek or Latin is required. The UCAS tariff score is applicable...

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Assessment Methods

Assessment is an integral part of your university studies and usually consists of a combination of coursework and examinations, although this will vary from course to course - on some of our courses, assessment is entirely by coursework. The methods of assessment on this course are specified below under 'Methods of assessment on this course'. You will need to allow time to complete coursework and prepare for exams.

Where a course has unseen written examinations, these may be held termly, but, on the majority of our courses, exams are usually taken in the Summer term, during May to June. Exams may be held at other times of the year as well. In most cases, exams are held during the day on a weekday - if you have daytime commitments, you will need to make arrangements for daytime attendance - but some exams are held in the evening. Exam timetables are published online.

Assessment is an integral part of your university studies and usually consists of a combination of coursework and examinations, although this will vary from course to course - on some of our courses, assessment is entirely by coursework. The methods of assessment on this course are specified below under 'Methods of assessment on this course'. You will need to allow time to complete...

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